Tag

recruiting Archives - SourceMatch

Future of jobs Infographic Series – Industry Profile – Energy Utilities & Technologies

By | Blog | No Comments

Companies expect a good improvement by implementing the technologies below by changing the frontier between humans and machines when it comes to existing tasks between 2018 and 2022. Until last year, 2018, 71% of tasks were performed by humans, compared to 29%, by machines. By 2022, this standard is expected to change to 58% task hours for humans and 42% by machines. However, last year no work task was yet estimated to be performed, most of all by algorithms or machines. At the same time, the expectation for 2022 is different, by increasing the contribution of machines and algorithms to 57%.
For instance, by 2022, 62% of the organization’s information and data processing, searching reports and transmission tasks will be completed by machines, compared to 46% today. Even the ordinary tasks that are not so overwhelming for humans such as communicating and interacting (23%), developing, managing and advising (20%); likewise decision-making and reasoning (18%) will start to be automated ( 30%, 29%, and 27%).

So what do these numbers tell us?

The large firms in the global (non-agricultural) workforce indicate that 75 million jobs may be displaced by a shift in the division of activity between machines and humans, while 133 million new roles may arise that are suitable to the new division of work between humans, algorithms, and machines. At the same time, these estimates and hypothesis behind them should be treated with caution, because they represent a subdivision of employment globally, they are useful in highlighting the types of adaptation strategies that must be installed to assist the progress of the transition of the workforce to the new world.

Here are three aspects tackled for you. They will show you how Energy Utilities & Technologies are influenced by the adoption of new technologies, they will also illustrate the existing barriers created, and they will summarize the impact on the workforce.

Let’s start with a look at the following infographic. A huge share of analysis of the respondents from the industry indicated that, by 2022, their company was “likely” or “very likely” (on a 5-point scale) to have adopted new technology as part of its growth strategy.

Secondly, if we check out the barriers to adoption of new technologies, we can discover that the five biggest perceived barriers to the implementation of new technologies across the industry, as ranked by the share of survey respondents. The following graphic will inform you which were the major obstacles, that were chosen by the surveyed people, perceived as impediments to successful new technology adoption faced by their company.

Thirdly, we would like to share this information related to the expected impact of new technology adoption on the workforce. In this last graphic, you can see the percentages representing the share of survey respondents from the industry who expect their company to have adopted the stated measure(s) over the 2018–2022 period as part of their current growth strategy.

The expectation of this technological progress presents a real challenge to the existing business models and practices. At the same time, we hope for the next years that these dynamic changes, whether they are causing confusion or will be constructive will be the exact reason why new opportunities of growth appear.

Source: Report

10 Recruiting quotes that your business needs to be aligned with

By | Blog | No Comments

Here are the top 10 recruiting quotes that inspired us in the day-to-day operations and decision-making processes. We hope you find them useful, whether you are a recruiter or a hiring manager.

1. “People are not assets – they are highly valuable human resources that determine your competitive advantage. ” SourceMatch

Human resources can be the biggest differentiator for businesses in the marketplace, and hence should be a priority. Why? Products, decisions, strategies, brand, values, are all created and managed by people.

With all the challenges of today’s economy, businesses need the right people to address them, to innovate, and push the company forward. By doing that, businesses can develop a significant competitive advantage.

2. “Sourcing and finding people is very important. You can’t recruit, message, or network with someone you haven’t found.” Glen Cathey

As the workforce becomes broader and more diversified, recruiters need to cast a wider net and need sharper tools to find the needle in the haystack. We have to go outside of general recruiting channels that are flooded with very active candidates, and focus on the passive candidates. Most of them are not looking to change jobs and are successful in their current role.

3. “A recruiting company should be viewed as a business partner, someone who is critical to the success of the business.” Mathew Caldwell

You need two hands if you want to clap! The recruiting process should be viewed as a partnership where you get to know each other, you focus on everybody benefiting from it, and create long-term relationships. When that happens, a recruiting partner will boost your ability to reach the best talent faster and will make any cost associated with it easily justifiable.

4. “Trust your recruiters to be your digital warriors. Don’t second guess them.” Celinda Appleby

Recruiters, first of all, listen to your needs. You have to share the context of the role, the job description, the organization’s vision, values, and objectives. That will help them have a holistic view of the candidate that could be a perfect match. Achieving that at the forefront of the recruiting process will set it up for success, and clarify expectations.

5. “The more seriously you take your growth, the more seriously your people will take you.” John Maxwell

Employees are motivated by leaders, and if leaders see beyond the title and job description, so will the employees. If your employees understand your vision, the big picture, and know their part, they will be willing and capable of contributing exponentially to the company’s goals.

6. “Hire for passion and intensity; there is training for everything else.” Nolan Bushnell

What do you need to know about your future employees? Skills and experience are important but should only come second to their attitude. That’s what you need to consider first in the hiring process.
For instance, when you review their resume, it’s quite easy to follow tangible outcomes, results, and facts. However, what matters is “HOW” they worked towards those results. Was it because of their dedication to client satisfaction? Was it because their positive attitude despite challenges in the process? Was it because they proactively thought of potential drawbacks? Answers to questions like these will show you the true attitude of the person beyond the resume, and help you understand whether you need to hire them or not.

7. “Accept the fact that AI will change our work, but look at it as an enabler of your work and the future of talent acquisition.” Przemek Berendt

According to a Deloitte Bersin report, companies that use AI, predictive data analytics and other technology tools are more successful than those who don’t. However, AI needs to be a tool that complements our own abilities. In talent acquisition, AI is especially helpful in making sense of large volumes of applications, effective usage of time in reviewing the required skills and clarity of one’s experience in their resume. Naturally, there are still parts of the recruiting process which are inherently still most effective when handled by human resources. For instance, the interviewing process will allow the recruiter to get to know a candidate based on their nonverbal communication, which is estimated to account for up to 93% of all communication.

8. “Understanding what “best talent” looks like is a journey into your organizational culture.” SourceMatch

Think this way: there are great candidates out there. But hiring someone that matches your job description isn’t enough. What does “best” mean to you and to your organizational culture? They’ll need to align with your vision, mission, and values, to ensure that they are going in the same direction as the company. Otherwise, those new employees won’t be able to contribute to the company’s momentum for growth. This is why your vision, mission, and values determine what “best” means, how it’s measured and appreciated.

9. “Interviews don’t need to be stressful, neither for recruiter or candidate, but rather a pleasant incursion into one’s experience, personality, abilities, and potential.” SourceMatch

Beautiful isn’t it? Or at least it should be! Hiring managers are responsible with creating the right experience for candidates being interviewed. They will influence the candidate’s’ openness to be transparent and fair about their responses, but also create the right setting for a two-way street. We are used to think that candidates show up at interviews just for the job, but the truth is that it’s the perfect time for companies to have a positive impression on them too.

10. “If you think it’s expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur.” Red Adair

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the price of a bad hire is at least 30 percent of the employee’s first-year earnings. It’s easy to dismiss a candidate based on salary alone and the true cost of a bad hire is only visible after a few months. Not paying attention in the first place can lead to a mismatch of expectations, bruised personalities, useless conflicts, financial and sometimes motivation loss. So think well and evaluate what’s the trade-off between candidate salary levels, expertise, abilities, and especially attitude.

Why should you recruit leaders?

By | Blog | No Comments

For a company to be successful it needs to have a team that is constantly improving. This is the ultimate goal of every company: to serve the market and create valuable results. But, in order to do so, the company must have a strong team of leaders. They are the ones who inspire other people to take action by showing them the way, and taking the first steps towards a clear goal.

Be selective.
This means to be discerning when choosing certain individuals to be part of your team. When you think of adding someone to your team, get know that particular person as much as you can before doing so. The best piece of advice would be to start first with the people you already know. They are the people from your office you interact with on a daily basis. You know their skills and how they work. At the same time pay close attention to their skills and how well they use them.

Good leadership drives vision
Best-selling author and keynote speaker, Jon Gordon, believes that people follow the leader first and the leader’s vision second. If the leader is not an individual who is followed by the people around him, then his vision won’t be taken into consideration by anyone. Another important aspect is to let your entire team know the vision of the company. If they truly believe in the company’s vision the will passionately work for it. Consequently, the growth of the company will be visible. As a company you need to identify a compelling goal and, in this way, your team will be focused to work well on the assigned tasks. However, having a number of goals will not determine the engagement of your team. Their motivation to work for the company is fueled by their belief in the company’s vision.

Ask, don’t tell
Having a team of leaders means asking them questions and not telling them what to do. If you ask questions they will share their own opinions. In this way, they will be encouraged to think proactively as their responses matter to them. Seeing that you care about their answers they will be more and more involved. Every time you meet with them make sure you ask them about their insights, fresh ideas and other suggestions they might have. Your team won’t be able to develop if you are the only one who does the talking.

Nothing under the rug
An important lesson every organization must learn is this to confront the ugly. There will always be situations where employees make mistakes. The leader should understand that he can’t avoid difficult conversations. What he has to do is confront the issues as soon as possible to get things back on track as quickly as possible. It is very important how you talk with each individual and, remember, a good attitude is key. A true leader must pay attention to the attitude towards the people he is interacting with. American captain of manufacturing and magnate, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, Henry Ford used to say: Don’t find fault, find a remedy. When something wrong happens, the leader finds a way to make things work. Telling someone about a problem without giving a solution is redundant.

Be real with appreciation
Last but not least, appreciation means a lot to the employees. Knowing that someone truly appreciates the work you are doing will give you a boost to do even a better job. A leader should know that his responsibility is to motivate the individuals he is interacting with, develop themselves and aim higher. That is why, he must not use cheap compliments that do not mean a thing, but genuine appreciation.

Recruiting is key
At Sourcematch we are recruiting leaders for other companies, not just simple employees. We encourage you to do the same. In a great article in Forbes Magazine, Ken Sundhein, expressed his opinion that, although recruiting leaders may be stressful, hard and time-consuming, it pays off in the long run. In his opinion, leaders are the ones who will enable a specific organization to reach its goals.

One thing you must understand is that true leaders get things done. We are not only referring to those people who work in top management roles but in every position. You need people who think and act like a true leader. Imagine what your company would look like if your teams would be formed by leaders.

People in management roles must know that a firm lives and dies by its ability to recruit leaders. If you are a business, one of your goals is to increase the level of productivity and motivate your employees to make a quantifiable progress. You can’t do this unless you have a strong team of leaders who are able to act for the benefit of the company and with the good of the employees in mind. However, if you hire incompetent leaders, your clients won’t be satisfied and you won’t get any competitive advantage.

Thrive, don’t just survive
Business can only thrive each business when leaders don’t just replicate other people’s ideas but also create. Each business needs to be innovative so that is why you need to have creative leaders.

These are some important ideas you might want to take into consideration if you want both your company and your team of leaders to succeed.

 

Photo credit: Rawpixel on Unsplash

Recruitment Infographic 2018

By | Blog | No Comments

Are your recruiting efforts ineffective and inefficient? Have you gone through bad hires, money and time-consuming talent acquisition processes? Adapt your current hiring strategy based on the latest trends.

If you want to hire the right people, make sure their experience with your brand is a positive one.
Statistics show that job seekers consider the reputation of a company when applying to job offers. This means that offering good wages/packages won’t be enough to bring them to the table and especially if you want to attract the best people on the market.

Attract people that are talented and qualified by taking care of the employer branding.

 

Source Infographic: https://www.talentnow.com/recruitment-statistics-2018-trends-insights-hiring-talented-candidates/

 

How CATS Improves the SourceMatch Recruiting Experience

By | Blog, Recruiting | No Comments

Technology plays a crucial role in advancing efficiency and financial results. According to the 2017 North American Staffing & Recruiting Trends Report, technology adoption is unsurprisingly high: 64% of North American staffing firms use an applicant tracking system (ATS) to track candidate activity and 60% use a customer relationship management (CRM) system for business development. Recruiters want to work smart, not harder. At SourceMatch, it’s this philosophy why we use CATS as our applicant tracking system for all of our recruiting processes.

CATS helps us save time, organize better and structure our recruitment operations in little time. When one of our clients needs 5 new hires in the management department within a short time frame, we trust the automation CATS provides to hire the right people in an efficient manner.

The recruitment workflow in CATS is streamlined and helps us shorten the time it takes from receiving an order to presenting the hiring manager with the best candidates – a huge benefit in the recruiting industry. It’s easy to track and manage candidates through the recruiting process so that team members can see the most up-to-date statuses and quickly move forward with the next interview, the offer, or whatever the next step in the process is.

Thanks to its user-friendly interface, custom dashboards, and numerous integration options, CATS quickly becomes something that just makes sense to us (including our new hires). When we do have a question, we can rely on CATS’ support team for the assistance we need, when we need it.

Many recruiters work on a regular basis with Excel or Google Sheets. Though these do work for simplistic tasks (detailing a project status, defining task types, etc.), they lack the intuition of software built for recruiters. CATS is customizable through workflow optimization, job orders dashboard and many more productivity and analytics features. CATS also post your jobs on several job boards (free and some paid) which helps with attracting talent. It is a software built by recruiters, for recruiters, and it shows.

Recruiting has its challenges, but the fact that each experience is different in and of itself helps us improve and become better at what we do. Our experience taught us that regardless of the type of work we are doing, we must always use the right tools in order to succeed. For SourceMatch, CATS is not only the right tool, it’s the applicant tracking system we recommend to anyone for their hiring needs.

 

Photo credit: Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

What are some red-flags that let you know that something’s wrong with your recruiting process?

By | Blog, Recruiting | No Comments

Red flags are the absence of an early warning system. Of course, the obvious problems are consequences/effects of deeper causes and require reactive solving.

A strong recruiting process, like any business process, can only work well if it’s built with all its stakeholders’ interest in mind: Recruiter (recruitment company), the hiring manager (internal clients or external client company) and candidate – in this chronological order.

When any of the stakeholders is not given enough attention during recruitment you may see scenarios such as:

  • The recruiter is under a lot of pressure from the client to deliver, cuts corners in the candidate selection process. The client will receive a candidate whose qualifications are at best short of their need. The candidate will have her or his hopes high, expecting the “opportunity of their career”. The recruiter will live with the impression that he’s done a great job for the time he’s been given to find a candidate.
  • The client makes a recruitment order for a new role with the recruiter and picks a standard job description off the internet. The recruiter might look for a purple squirrel candidate that might not exist, or best-case scenario fits the internet’ job description instead of the real needs of the client. The candidate feels she’s a perfect fit and is surprised during the interview when the client brings up all sorts of questions that are beyond the “internet job description!”
  • Candidate interviews with the recruiter and provides basic answers to the vague questions that the recruiter asks. The recruiter is unbelievably happy that the candidate is a “perfect match”. The client interviews the candidate and is dumbfounded when they ask the candidate to elaborate on their experience.

These are just some examples, but in our experience, at SourceMatch there are a few guidelines for recruiters, which will help everyone in the process win. Here’s the early warning system for recruiters:

  1. Get to know your client, their trade, their culture, values, the hiring manager, the team where the new hire will work in, tangible and intangible factors, must haves and nice to have. Set the expectation early on with the client that you expect them to help you understand who they are and who they are trying to hire. The Job Description is at best 50% of all useful information. Once you have all info, ask the client to confirm in writing that there’s nothing left unsaid about their expectations for the new hire (in essence, that you understand well what they need).
  2. Always strive to exceed client’s expectations when it comes to due diligence for the candidate’s qualifications, experience, skills, behavior, performance etc. Ask meaningful and detailed questions of your candidates. Ask for real-life examples. Let the candidate know that it’s the only way they can present themselves in a unique way.
  3. Be transparent and honest about the job when you speak with the candidate. If it’s a parallel move for them, don’t make it sound like it’s something else. Be open and let them know of the advantages and challenges of the role at the same time. If they are at a different point in their career than what you expected, don’t oversell the position. Same can be said with candidates that miss the mark on the client’s expectations.
  4. If a client has unrealistic / hard-to-meet expectations regarding the speed of recruiting or available candidates in the talent pool, you must speak up! You need to act as a consultant to the client. Because you are the expert of your trade, you will have unique perspectives that have been tested and validated throughout tens or hundreds of recruiting engagements.
  5. When you present a candidate to the client (ideally over the phone or in person), make sure to show clearly why they were selected, and to what degree they meet/exceed the expectations that were agreed in the first place. Don’t just present a resume, but also let the client about your thought process. This is a tremendous opportunity to act as a consultant to your client.
  6. Time and information will break you regardless if you are disciplined or not. That’s why you need to have a system – an applicant tracking system – to follow through your process and to keep you on track, remind you about upcoming calls, meetings, deadlines, tasks, etc.
  7. Always follow up with candidate and clients with regular updates, even if they are negative – i.e. a different candidate has been selected following the in-person interview with the client. When you don’t communicate in the recruitment process, stakeholders will assume the worse.

You may start with these 7-steps early warning system and develop your own version, but thinking proactively about everything that can go wrong will prepare you for most of what can go wrong.

 

Photo credit: Photo by James Pond on Unsplash

Is it more important for a company to hire based on skill set fit or based on cultural fit?

By | Blog, Recruiting | No Comments

 

Of course, no one feels comfortable having to choose between the two. And yet, we don’t live in a perfect world and candidates bring different things to the interview table.

To even start thinking this topic through, it’s important we understand what a skill set is and what makes up the cultural fit.

Are skill sets important?

A skill set is a particular category of skills or abilities necessary to perform a job. Skill sets are easy to showcase based on previous jobs, numbers, achievements or in other words quantifiable facts. A good recruiter would have no problem to assess these looking at a resume, through interviews or tests.
So why even have any debates when a candidate can fit the job from a skills point of view?
After all, they will require less hand-holding, less training, and a shorter ramp-up period in the new job. They are people that hold a certain level of expertise that can just be plugged into an organization and bring immediate results.

What about culture fit?

It’s very tempting for recruiters who spend merely seconds to pick and choose what candidates will make it forward in the selections process. Candidates have complex personalities and unique combinations of upbringing and experiences.
When searching for new hires, hiring managers and recruiters want to ensure that the person who’ll join the organization will have preferences, personal and work styles that aren’t far from the hiring organization’s culture. Organizational psychology guru Adrian Furnham offers a definition for the cultural fit in his seminal academic textbook, “The Psychology of Behaviour at Work”: “A fit is where there is congruence between the norms and values of the organization and those of the person.”
Asking candidate’s questions such as the following will help you uncover their, likes, dislikes and expectations:

 -> Why do you want to work here?
 -> How would you describe your ideal workplace?
 -> What makes the work environment frustrating to you?
 -> Do you prefer working in a team or alone/as a sole contributor?
 -> Who was your best boss and what made them so great?

It’s critical however you take these questions and customize them to help you compare with your organization’s culture. Some companies are more loose when it comes to time and make results the sole main requirement, some are very eclectic and laid back wanting to foster creativity and outside-the-box thinking, and some that are very formal such as banks and other financial institutions.
If he/she is a fit, then they will feel good working for the company’s goals. The importance of cultural fit will reflect in the employee’s productivity. They will also be interested in the results they bring.

So what now?

You do need people to bring the right skills to the table to fulfill their jobs, and you also want a great alignment between the person’s and the organization’s values. However, as mentioned we don’t live in a perfect work: What if you had to choose between the skill set and culture alignment?
Culture always comes first.

Culture is the glue that holds an organization together, and the cost of poor culture fit can cost that organization between 50% to 60% of the person’s annual salary. So before you start vetting candidates, it’s critical that you define and articulate the organization’s culture (values, goals, practices, etc.). Only then will the recruiting process highlight the best candidates according that fit the culture.
Everything considered, culture fit should never be at the expense of different personalities, backgrounds, and a diverse workforce.

However, you do need to prioritize. First, make sure the values, ethics, morals, principles, etc. are there. Otherwise, you may find yourself hiring someone who has outstanding skills with a poor cultural fit. They will challenge your organization’s existence at every step of the way, either silently, or vocally. Sometimes it’s useful to have a new and constructive perspective on things. But if you have a culture that has proven time and time again to be beneficial for the organization’s development, for its employees and not the least its customers, then you should stick to it. Someone new who will not integrate with the team and organization will only cause unnecessary friction.

Lastly, in order to decrease the probability that you need to be in such a tough situation to choose between skill set and culture, hire continuously. Always be on the lookout for people who are shining in their current roles, who are delivering value to their customers and enjoy being part of something greater than themselves and their jobs.

 

Photo credit: Photo by Hunters Race on Unsplash

What do interviewers expect when asking: “Do you have any questions for us?”

By | Blog, Interview, Job, Questions | No Comments

We’ll start with one statement: The interviewer expects you to be genuine.

We know there are probably hundreds of online and printed articles about the smartest questions you can come up with. It all comes down to you and the opportunity in front of you.

Let’s start with you.

There are a lot of things that are important to you, and only a handful that is crucial. Those are typical aspects that reflect what you expect of your life, career, the people or things that make you happy and fulfilled, and not least your health (this is a shortlist, you certainly have your own). You are there because in one way or another the job opportunity you’re interviewing for contributes to what’s critical to you. Once you’ve figured that out, think about what kind of questions you could ask that will clarify whether pursuing the job opportunity will contribute to what’s critical to you.

For instance, you may think: “In the long run, I want to be an outstanding business consultant, however, I don’t have any experience right now, so it’s crucial I get a job that helps me grow towards that ideal role.” so your question for the interviewer might be: “How does the company plan for professional development/growth?

Or you may think: “it’s crucial that I work for organizations that value a healthy culture that encourages creativity, instead of a top-down” so your question to the interviewer might be: “Could I meet some of the people I’d be working with?” If they are open to the idea, it will be a good way to tell what kind of culture you’d be dealing with.

Then continue with them

In the same way, think about what’s important to the company, why have they even posted this job? Is it because they’re growing? Is it because someone left? Is it because someone got promoted? Is it because it’s part of their strategy? Some questions you may ask:

How does this role help the company?

What made the person before me successful in this role?

Why has the person in this role decided to leave?

Or you can direct your question toward the interviewer himself:

What do you like most about working here?

If you were to change anything for the better at this company, what would it be?

Why did you decide to work for this company in the first place?”

You also want to get a clearer understanding of how they thought the interview went:

How do you think I and my qualifications match the company’s and hiring manager’s expectations?

Do your homework

Employers do spend the time to put Job Descriptions together. But that’s not all that they have on their webpage that can give you an idea of who they are and what they do. Their “about” page will help you know how they think, what they value (value/principles), where they’re going (vision), and how they’re going to get there (mission/objectives). Then review their “products/services” section of their website. Is there any aspect in particular that intrigues you? Is there anything that you think might be related to your job?

Ask a few specific questions that will help you have a complete picture:

How do you measure the effectiveness of that product or services?”

I noticed one of your values emphasizes the importance of people. How do I pursue this value?”

How often can someone get involved in corporate social responsibility initiatives?

Notice most of the questions are open-ended. This approach ensures you get the most out of your of conversation with the interviewers.

How they respond is an important indicator of that organization’s values. Did they provide honest and meaningful answers? Were they specific or generic/quoting from a “textbook”? Etc.

So be genuine, be yourself!

 

Photo credit: rawpixel.com on Unsplash

What do recruiters look for in a resumé at first glance?

By | Blog, Career, Job, Recruiting | No Comments

To get the best talent for the client, a recruiter will spend the time to evaluate resumes in accordance with the target profile. They will look at the resume components that relate to the candidate’s potential to be successful in the client’s organization. They will try to understand both tangible and intangible facets of a candidate’s background in relation to the client’s requirements for that position. Here are 10 specific areas that recruiters look at:

  1. What kind of organizations, teams, and cultures has the candidate worked in (i.e. corporate vs entrepreneurial, teamwork vs individual/expert consulting focuses work, focused on innovation/continuous improvement, etc.)?
  2. Is there any recent time gap in the resume? Could that kind of gap affect the relevancy of the candidate’s skills for the role they are applying for?
  3. If a candidate has focused on contract work, it may appear like job hopping – clarify whether a job was a contract or not by mentioning it in the resume. It could be that for the current job the client is looking for loyalty to previous employers (i.e. 3+ years average) or for someone who can come in and solve a problem and move on.
  4. Amount and relevancy of quantifiable achievements/facts – i.e. for each job, list top 3 achievements, and top 3 activities you’ve been involved in.
  5. The resume should not be too long (more 3 pages), or too short (less than a page), and with just enough info to strike a good balance between keeping it brief and having enough facts.
  6. If you are a recent graduate, fill in the page with the main school, extracurricular or internship projects that you were involved in – what you did and what were the outcomes.
  7. Resumes must be customized for each role in the sense of emphasizing the skills and expertise relevant to the role that the candidate is applying for.
  8. With today’s tools available online, there’s no reason why a resume would not be verified for grammar and spelling accuracy.
  9. Finally, the resume should be structured in such a way that it’s easy to read, without using difficult or unusual fonts (mainly sans serif fonts are easier to read – such as Arial, Segoe UI or Verdana)
  10. Make sure to insert page numbers if your resume is longer than a page. It makes it easy to follow through multiple pages.

Finally, make sure that the resume shows the real you. After all, a resume is a document that shows not only what you did, but what your potential is for your next employer. Use it wisely!

 

Photo credit: Nik MacMillan on Unsplash

What’s the biggest problem modern recruiters face?

By | Blog, Recruiting | No Comments

Today’s (2018) greatest challenge for #recruiters is staying human in an era of lightning-fast technology.

If until a few years back we could still hope to build relationships with candidates and client organizations, and act as that educated advisor (at best) for both candidates and clients, today things are changing fast. Speed has taken the steering wheel of recruiting over a careful consideration of all factors that can make a professional success in the job and organization they are considering and vice versa.

Dehumanizing the whole process leads to superficial hiring and disaster (whether organizations like to admit it or not) just months after the hiring decision has been made. The later can take many forms but here are just a few: the disappointment when new hires understand that everyone involved in the process made a rushed decision, the lack of engagement and creativity pursuant to that reality check, and finally, a decision to start looking for another employer from that point on or in other cases just staying complacent (pick your own worst-case scenario!).

On the one hand, as recruiting specialists, we need to educate our clients about the risks of moving too fast (i.e. just bodies in placeholders), and on the other, consult candidates so that they are equipped to make a sound decision (i.e. right career move).

Technology is a great tool but a terrible master!

 

 Photo credit: Paul Bence on Unsplash