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Are You Listening?

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We’re all familiar with the fact that communication has two dimensions which are: speaking (expression) and listening (reception). Furthermore, there are four ways we communicate: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. But, what does it takes to become an excellent communicator? It is not just about speaking but also about listening. Speakers have the power to share their opinion and influence, but in the end, listeners will be the ones to who validate a message or not.
One of the greatest lessons in life is to listen with the intent to understand what is being said, instead of just listening to respond. However, listening is essential to those who want to be successful in their professional or personal life. And the best way to start listening effectively is by not talking.

There are a few questions out there, that many of you may be wondering: How many of us are really good listeners? Can we learn something by listening? The fact is, that real listeners are hard to find, but when you come across one, it is like a breath of fresh air and it gives one the satisfaction of real communication. People spend 70 to 80% of their time engaged in many different forms of communication but only 55% of them, are really listening.
Nowadays, it is easier to connect with others than before. But the question is: “Are we becoming bad at communicating?”. You might also wonder, what does this have to do with recruiting? It has everything to do with recruiting. Becoming a better listener is not as hard as it seems, but it requires commitment and effort. Still, before you go in this direction of learning how to become a better listener, remember that nobody is perfect, but being persistent and dedicated leads to improvement. There are two types of listeners: Active listeners and passive listeners.

Active listeners
The person who pays attention and listens to understand what the speaker has to say and also provides feedback when it’s required is an active listener. It is also the person who has the careful attention to non-verbal forms of communication such as eye contact, expressions and also hand gestures. The truth is that this skill requires a lot of practice, it is not as easy as it sounds. During an interview with a candidate or a typical conversation, the most important thing to do is be present at the moment. Allow that person/ candidate to speak, stay focused on his words instead of planning your response. Active listeners are also open-minded. They absorb what other people are saying without interruption and accepting new ideas or perspectives instead of interjecting their own opinion. Instead of jumping into conclusions, let the other person express his or her view.

Passive listeners
Passive listeners don’t make an effort to understand what the speaker has to say. However, they can be physically present and they can hear the conversation but may be completely distracted. Their job is to sit quietly and not respond to what the speaker has to say. Picture yourself listening to music when you are doing something. Although the music is playing, you pay attention to other work. Students are constantly dealing with this type of listening. They hear the teacher, but are not attentive, therefore they do not retain the information. The former Senior VP and General manager of Nordstrom company, Betsy Sanders, said: “To learn through listening, practice it naively and actively. Naively means that you listen openly, ready to learn something, as opposed to listening defensively, ready to rebut. Listening actively means you acknowledge what you heard and act accordingly.”

How can we improve our listening skills?

Don’t look for the next thing to say, hear what the other person has to say, without planning your response. Our team of recruiters has many interviews every day and sometimes it can be challenging. If you’re a recruiter, it might be that you’ve had the perfect interview with a candidate. Therefore you are convinced that she will be the right fit for the job and you quickly screen her up by running through your checklist of questions. Scheduling the interview with the hiring manager would be the next step to take, but later you might find out that you have missed a few things which are important, and you’ll need to go back to talking with the candidate. Being engaged in the conversation and not looking for the next thing to say, will actually save you time in the long term.

Less talking more listening
People who talk too much don’t always have much to say. That doesn’t mean that they know everything. This can lead to problems. You need to know when to stop talking and start listening. In our business, meetings and interviews are very important, they give you the opportunity to learn more and improve your knowledge. “A person who’s talking is giving away information–often more than he or she intended. A person who’s listening is receiving information”.(The Medium). A few things you can avoid doing are: giving out wrong information, making wrong assumptions, and also making use of the same resources. These can make you look less intelligent than you actually are.

Stop multitasking
For recruiters as for many others, time is very valuable. Reports, emails, scheduled interviews, training other employees and many other tasks can be difficult. If you miss doing them at the right time, your projects and even your job might be at risk. But still, multitasking isn’t a superpower. Many are convinced that it helps them be more efficient and productive. Instead, it reduces your efficiency and performance. It is also slowing down your productivity and decreases the quality of your work. Let’s not forget that multitasking is affecting the quality of the conversation and also make people feel uncomfortable and unimportant, and some even angry. Instead of multitasking focus on being more organized, you will be amazed to see how many things you will do.

Always maintain eye contact with the speaker
You don’t have to stare at the speaker, you can look away now and then acting normal, but still be attentive. Picture yourself in a meeting, when your project manager has a presentation and you are distracted by your phone, or computer. Are you consciously taking that information in? You might create an uncomfortable situation. When you allow your mind to be distracted, those around you will notice it. Always maintain eye contact during a conversation, it is the most essential aspect of effective communication. Also, making eye contact with your listeners establishes a connection with them and conveys confidence and honesty.

Interrupting and imposing solutions
We all know how that interrupting someone during a conversation is rude. If one of your clients is presenting their problem, refrain talking about your solution until the end. Try to listen before you talk. If they need your help or advice, they’ll ask. Keep your ideas until the end and ask the speaker’s permission if he would like to hear about them. More than often, this is just basic communication courtesy, and most will not refuse. Although it is important if you are often interrupted during your speech, something might be wrong with it. Did you get the listeners attention, did you miss anything? Try figure it out, what didn’t work? Dealing with this kind of situation is challenging and requires a lot of practice, interruptions are not exceptions.

Ask questions
One of the simplest ways to become a better listener is to ask more questions than you can answer. You can also create a safe space for others to be honest with you. Questions not only make you look smarter but also show that you are interested. It is also helpful when you are in doubt, to clear up misunderstandings. Wait for the speaker to pause, though, then ask the clarifying questions.

Be empathic
Being empathic allows you to feel the same as the speaker does. You also give others permission to be relatable. Don’t forget to express joy when your speaker expresses happiness, and sadness when the other person is sad. To experience empathy, you need to put yourself in the other person’s place. It takes determination and concentration. But in the end, it is the best thing you can do in communication.

Summarize
One great way to become a good listener is to summarize what the other person just said. This can help you understand what really happened. You can avoid any misunderstanding that could lead to frustration. Instead of making assumptions, summarizing helps you add your perspective, thoughts or even questions about what’s being said or not. We all have meetings, important conversations, and informal chats. Regardless of the person in front of you, wanting to understand what they’re really saying will go a long way. Listen carefully and write down only the essential words without adding any personal opinions.

According to the great psychotherapist, Carl Rogers, the major barrier in communication is our very natural inclination to judge, to approve or disapprove and to evaluate the disclosure of the other person or the other group. However, this evaluative tendency can be avoided when we listen to understand. “It means to see the expressed idea and attitude from the other person’s point of view, to sense how it feels to him, to achieve his frame of reference in regard to the thing he is talking about.”

A good listener is patient, attentive, responsive, curious, provides constructive feedback, is empathic, shows interest to the speaker as a person, is open-minded, doesn’t criticize and is nonjudgmental. Mastering the art of listening is a tremendous ability! Nonetheless, becoming a good listener takes time and practice, and it won’t happen in a flash. It requires willingness and commitment. By learning, we develop our virtues of patience and humbleness. It also teaches us to resolve conflicts by avoiding them. “Listening actually changes the person to whom you are listening”(Carl Rogers).
We encourage you to listen and actually wait for your turn to talk. Listen attentively, you can always learn new things from another person’s experience. Once you are aware of that you won’t jump into “Ok, it’s my turn”, you’ll have the ability to appreciate someone’s story or advice.

We strongly believe that a recruiter’s most powerful skill is being an active listener. Our advice is to take time to listen to your candidates and try to find what is really important to them. Recruiters have the responsibility to match the best candidates with the right positions. When it comes to our client’s organizations, it’s important we understand their requirements, get familiar with their business and culture before we can think about what candidates would be a good fit.

Our team is valuable, therefore keeping them motivated and happy is important. Trust your employees and encourage them to speak their minds. When they talk, it’s our turn to listen. Concerns or complaints are inevitable, and our mission is to solve them properly without rushing to judgments. Sometimes communication becomes a problem when we need to confront someone about their mistakes. Do it wisely without assuming that you have people figured out. Ask questions, listen and do your best to understand the whole picture. “Make sure that good listening techniques are a part of training at all levels of management, leadership, and HR so all your employees can feel comfortable addressing and reacting to complaints in the proper manner”(Cathy Siska, Chief Operating Officer).

Future of jobs Infographic Series – Industry Profile – Energy Utilities & Technologies

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Companies expect a good improvement by implementing the technologies below by changing the frontier between humans and machines when it comes to existing tasks between 2018 and 2022. Until last year, 2018, 71% of tasks were performed by humans, compared to 29%, by machines. By 2022, this standard is expected to change to 58% task hours for humans and 42% by machines. However, last year no work task was yet estimated to be performed, most of all by algorithms or machines. At the same time, the expectation for 2022 is different, by increasing the contribution of machines and algorithms to 57%.
For instance, by 2022, 62% of the organization’s information and data processing, searching reports and transmission tasks will be completed by machines, compared to 46% today. Even the ordinary tasks that are not so overwhelming for humans such as communicating and interacting (23%), developing, managing and advising (20%); likewise decision-making and reasoning (18%) will start to be automated ( 30%, 29%, and 27%).

So what do these numbers tell us?

The large firms in the global (non-agricultural) workforce indicate that 75 million jobs may be displaced by a shift in the division of activity between machines and humans, while 133 million new roles may arise that are suitable to the new division of work between humans, algorithms, and machines. At the same time, these estimates and hypothesis behind them should be treated with caution, because they represent a subdivision of employment globally, they are useful in highlighting the types of adaptation strategies that must be installed to assist the progress of the transition of the workforce to the new world.

Here are three aspects tackled for you. They will show you how Energy Utilities & Technologies are influenced by the adoption of new technologies, they will also illustrate the existing barriers created, and they will summarize the impact on the workforce.

Let’s start with a look at the following infographic. A huge share of analysis of the respondents from the industry indicated that, by 2022, their company was “likely” or “very likely” (on a 5-point scale) to have adopted new technology as part of its growth strategy.

Secondly, if we check out the barriers to adoption of new technologies, we can discover that the five biggest perceived barriers to the implementation of new technologies across the industry, as ranked by the share of survey respondents. The following graphic will inform you which were the major obstacles, that were chosen by the surveyed people, perceived as impediments to successful new technology adoption faced by their company.

Thirdly, we would like to share this information related to the expected impact of new technology adoption on the workforce. In this last graphic, you can see the percentages representing the share of survey respondents from the industry who expect their company to have adopted the stated measure(s) over the 2018–2022 period as part of their current growth strategy.

The expectation of this technological progress presents a real challenge to the existing business models and practices. At the same time, we hope for the next years that these dynamic changes, whether they are causing confusion or will be constructive will be the exact reason why new opportunities of growth appear.

Source: Report

Diversity inclusion Infographic

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Creating a diverse workplace definitely pays off. These recruitment statistics show that the top reasons companies focus on creating a diverse workplace are statistically connected to the benefits that come with it. Firstly, diversity improves company culture as reported by 78% of respondents. Secondly, it improves company performance at least according to 62% of the surveyed lot. And thirdly, a percentage of 49 of respondents said they incorporate diversity in their business so they can be more relatable to their clients.

Business leaders might want to better relate to customers because of the benefits it brings. McKinsey’s research on the link between company financial performance and ethnic, cultural, and gender diversity finds that companies in the top quartile for gender or racial and ethnic diversity are more likely to have financial returns above their national industry medians. In this case, some might want to look into ways of integrating into their organization people with different cultural backgrounds that would match the cultural dimensions of the business clientele. With regards to improving company performance, the same study pointed out that diversity is a competitive differentiator that is shifting market share toward more diverse companies. The analysis of the data revealed a positive relationship between financial performance and greater diversity in leadership. The reason for this might be because the more diverse a company is the better it is to improve employee satisfaction and thus decision making.

In conclusion, although improving organizational culture through variety might be difficult, it is well worth it. It might be hard to achieve a cohesive one direction oriented group with people from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds because of unconscious bias, but companies that manage to do it are also able to achieve a global mindset and cultural fluency which in turn translates into higher profit.

Source: https://www.talentnow.com/recruitment-statistics-2018-trends-insights-hiring-talented-candidates/

Recruitment statistics 2018

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Why are recruitment statistics important? Besides the fact that they keep us informed and help us guide our recruiting efforts, they can be powerful tools to improve.

In this statistics representation, we showed in numbers how easy/ hard it is to fill a position in the year 2018. Do you know what passive job seekers are? The following data will be of much help if you do a little research on how to direct your efforts when searching for talent. And the last item in our figures is related to the number of companies that promotes talent within the organization.

U.S. employers encounter difficulties when they want to fill new job openings. The statistics tell us that 50% of U.S. Employers reported that it is taking them longer to fill jobs today compared to any other period of time. This trend in human resource speaks about who has the upper hand when it comes to recruiting.

Job seekers hold the strongest influence on the job market. Some decide to pursue jobs based on long-term personal objectives and other will hop from one job to another based on salary alone.
In their search of the best talent, recruiters also need to consider candidates who are not actively searching for a job. According to the statistics, 73% of candidates are passive job seekers.

This turns out to be difficult for recruiters because passive candidates are not looking for new job opportunities since there’s typically a good reason: they are competent workers and they are happy with their current role. Convincing them to hop jobs might be difficult.
But there are also more optimistic statistics. For example, 79% of organizations are focusing their efforts towards building and promoting their own talent from within, meanwhile only half are recruiting from the external labor pools. Hiring from within their own organizations comes with numerous benefits for employers because it saves up on time and not to mention money. This is an ideal way for organizations to retain talent and to grow organically.

Source: https://www.talentnow.com/recruitment-statistics-2018-trends-insights-hiring-talented-candidates

Recruitment Statistics Infographic 2019

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A candidate driven recruitment market coupled with negative employer branding can make a recruiter’s job a hassle. If you also throw in the mix the talent shortage, the recruiter’s work becomes quite the challenge. Hurdles that recruiters will face in 2019 are no less challenging than they were before. This being the case, social media strategies and social listening tools, if used correctly, can ease the hiring process overall.

Trends
Understanding the statics regarding how the hiring process worked in 2018 is essential in understanding how to handle the challenges coming in the next few years. According to LinkedIn, the latest recruitment trends in the hiring process include diversity, new interviewing tools, data, and not last, artificial intelligence. Recruiting firms that harnessed the powers of these hiring processes had it good in 2018 and firms who want to strive must take notice of these trends.

A key statistical insight regarding diversity is that companies must not discriminate when recruiting. Companies who got on the bandwagon of diversity choose to do it because in their opinion it improved organizational culture (78%). Another statistical point of view is that when traditional points of view fail the most useful interviewing innovations that must kick in are soft skills (59%), job auditions (54%) and meeting in a casual setting (53%). The third major recruiting trend of 2018 was the increased use of data in the context of strategic hiring decisions. The numbers show us that 56% of the surveyed firms used data to increase retention rates. The fourth important HR trend of 2018 was the use of artificial intelligence in the hiring process.

Digital tools and automation
Recruitment automation improves the hiring process by making it more error-free.
Knowing all this, let’s follow up with some tips the can easily help to hire talented candidates using innovative hiring methods. 

The main observation we would like to point out is that recruitment in 2018 has more to do with social media than ever before considering that 67% of employers say social recruitment is vital in finding passive candidates, 66% of social hires weren’t looking for jobs when they were recruited by HR professionals using digital tools, and 63% of hiring managers say they successfully hired with social media.

The bottom line is: Go Social!

Source: https://www.talentnow.com/recruitment-statistics-2018-trends-insights-hiring-talented-candidates/

10 Recruiting quotes that your business needs to be aligned with

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Here are the top 10 recruiting quotes that inspired us in the day-to-day operations and decision-making processes. We hope you find them useful, whether you are a recruiter or a hiring manager.

1. “People are not assets – they are highly valuable human resources that determine your competitive advantage. ” SourceMatch

Human resources can be the biggest differentiator for businesses in the marketplace, and hence should be a priority. Why? Products, decisions, strategies, brand, values, are all created and managed by people.

With all the challenges of today’s economy, businesses need the right people to address them, to innovate, and push the company forward. By doing that, businesses can develop a significant competitive advantage.

2. “Sourcing and finding people is very important. You can’t recruit, message, or network with someone you haven’t found.” Glen Cathey

As the workforce becomes broader and more diversified, recruiters need to cast a wider net and need sharper tools to find the needle in the haystack. We have to go outside of general recruiting channels that are flooded with very active candidates, and focus on the passive candidates. Most of them are not looking to change jobs and are successful in their current role.

3. “A recruiting company should be viewed as a business partner, someone who is critical to the success of the business.” Mathew Caldwell

You need two hands if you want to clap! The recruiting process should be viewed as a partnership where you get to know each other, you focus on everybody benefiting from it, and create long-term relationships. When that happens, a recruiting partner will boost your ability to reach the best talent faster and will make any cost associated with it easily justifiable.

4. “Trust your recruiters to be your digital warriors. Don’t second guess them.” Celinda Appleby

Recruiters, first of all, listen to your needs. You have to share the context of the role, the job description, the organization’s vision, values, and objectives. That will help them have a holistic view of the candidate that could be a perfect match. Achieving that at the forefront of the recruiting process will set it up for success, and clarify expectations.

5. “The more seriously you take your growth, the more seriously your people will take you.” John Maxwell

Employees are motivated by leaders, and if leaders see beyond the title and job description, so will the employees. If your employees understand your vision, the big picture, and know their part, they will be willing and capable of contributing exponentially to the company’s goals.

6. “Hire for passion and intensity; there is training for everything else.” Nolan Bushnell

What do you need to know about your future employees? Skills and experience are important but should only come second to their attitude. That’s what you need to consider first in the hiring process.
For instance, when you review their resume, it’s quite easy to follow tangible outcomes, results, and facts. However, what matters is “HOW” they worked towards those results. Was it because of their dedication to client satisfaction? Was it because their positive attitude despite challenges in the process? Was it because they proactively thought of potential drawbacks? Answers to questions like these will show you the true attitude of the person beyond the resume, and help you understand whether you need to hire them or not.

7. “Accept the fact that AI will change our work, but look at it as an enabler of your work and the future of talent acquisition.” Przemek Berendt

According to a Deloitte Bersin report, companies that use AI, predictive data analytics and other technology tools are more successful than those who don’t. However, AI needs to be a tool that complements our own abilities. In talent acquisition, AI is especially helpful in making sense of large volumes of applications, effective usage of time in reviewing the required skills and clarity of one’s experience in their resume. Naturally, there are still parts of the recruiting process which are inherently still most effective when handled by human resources. For instance, the interviewing process will allow the recruiter to get to know a candidate based on their nonverbal communication, which is estimated to account for up to 93% of all communication.

8. “Understanding what “best talent” looks like is a journey into your organizational culture.” SourceMatch

Think this way: there are great candidates out there. But hiring someone that matches your job description isn’t enough. What does “best” mean to you and to your organizational culture? They’ll need to align with your vision, mission, and values, to ensure that they are going in the same direction as the company. Otherwise, those new employees won’t be able to contribute to the company’s momentum for growth. This is why your vision, mission, and values determine what “best” means, how it’s measured and appreciated.

9. “Interviews don’t need to be stressful, neither for recruiter or candidate, but rather a pleasant incursion into one’s experience, personality, abilities, and potential.” SourceMatch

Beautiful isn’t it? Or at least it should be! Hiring managers are responsible with creating the right experience for candidates being interviewed. They will influence the candidate’s’ openness to be transparent and fair about their responses, but also create the right setting for a two-way street. We are used to think that candidates show up at interviews just for the job, but the truth is that it’s the perfect time for companies to have a positive impression on them too.

10. “If you think it’s expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur.” Red Adair

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the price of a bad hire is at least 30 percent of the employee’s first-year earnings. It’s easy to dismiss a candidate based on salary alone and the true cost of a bad hire is only visible after a few months. Not paying attention in the first place can lead to a mismatch of expectations, bruised personalities, useless conflicts, financial and sometimes motivation loss. So think well and evaluate what’s the trade-off between candidate salary levels, expertise, abilities, and especially attitude.

What is the greatest challenge in Talent Acquisition?

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In our experience, starting with the recruitment consultant position, to the hiring manager, and leading a recruiting advisory company, the greatest challenge in Talent Acquisition is related to People.

Specifically, maintaining a clear understanding and human approach to the whole organizational brand, market presence efforts, and recruiting process.

Not doing that will lead both organizations and candidates to a mere transactional interaction that a) attracts the wrong candidates and b) gives the organization the wrong idea about the recruiting process’ quality.

So how do companies lose grip on what really matters in searching and hiring for talent?

1. Focus on speed and KPIs only – it’s easy to look at numbers and say – we are doing good, but that’s just one side of performance in talent acquisition. A healthy process includes assessing behavioral traits and the candidate’s behavior in certain situations, assessment of skills in terms of real-life examples and situations (and correlated outcomes) when these were acquired or exhibited, and an evaluation of the basic values that are required to have a good cultural fit.
Ultimately, the validation of all of these after 3, 6 or 12 months is what improves talent acquisition.

2. Superficial screening based on skills only – while skills are an important part in figuring out whether a candidate is a good fit for the organization, it’s insufficient to evaluate a candidate’s fit through these alone. A candidate’s personality, resulting behavior, potential, expectations, ambitions and motivators, capability to add value through different perspectives, etc., are all important. In essence, evaluating a candidate is more than mere math.
Of course, it’s very useful to quantify all of the above through various assessments and different interviewers, but not at the expense of a complete understanding of who the candidate is and what they can be in your organization.

3. The influx of data, easiness of access to dozens of resume databases, and growth by any means are some other causes of a poorly structures talent acquisition. Talent acquisition, beyond recruitment, is meant to create a clear representation in the market of who the organization is, and who it’s trying to attract.
In other words: the organization’s brand and what a successful candidate looks like. Failing to paint the right pictures in both areas can significantly affect who they attract and why. It all needs to start with planning from A to Z: what happens when a job opening shows up, how the job description, environment and success are defined, how that connects to the organization’s growth objectives, how those are then embedded in the recruiting process and finally the values that will hold everything together.

Anytime your talent acquisition takes shortcuts, the organization ends up with a mismatch between people, jobs, and growth potential.

What are some red-flags that let you know that something’s wrong with your recruiting process?

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Red flags are the absence of an early warning system. Of course, the obvious problems are consequences/effects of deeper causes and require reactive solving.

A strong recruiting process, like any business process, can only work well if it’s built with all its stakeholders’ interest in mind: Recruiter (recruitment company), the hiring manager (internal clients or external client company) and candidate – in this chronological order.

When any of the stakeholders is not given enough attention during recruitment you may see scenarios such as:

  • The recruiter is under a lot of pressure from the client to deliver, cuts corners in the candidate selection process. The client will receive a candidate whose qualifications are at best short of their need. The candidate will have her or his hopes high, expecting the “opportunity of their career”. The recruiter will live with the impression that he’s done a great job for the time he’s been given to find a candidate.
  • The client makes a recruitment order for a new role with the recruiter and picks a standard job description off the internet. The recruiter might look for a purple squirrel candidate that might not exist, or best-case scenario fits the internet’ job description instead of the real needs of the client. The candidate feels she’s a perfect fit and is surprised during the interview when the client brings up all sorts of questions that are beyond the “internet job description!”
  • Candidate interviews with the recruiter and provides basic answers to the vague questions that the recruiter asks. The recruiter is unbelievably happy that the candidate is a “perfect match”. The client interviews the candidate and is dumbfounded when they ask the candidate to elaborate on their experience.

These are just some examples, but in our experience, at SourceMatch there are a few guidelines for recruiters, which will help everyone in the process win. Here’s the early warning system for recruiters:

  1. Get to know your client, their trade, their culture, values, the hiring manager, the team where the new hire will work in, tangible and intangible factors, must haves and nice to have. Set the expectation early on with the client that you expect them to help you understand who they are and who they are trying to hire. The Job Description is at best 50% of all useful information. Once you have all info, ask the client to confirm in writing that there’s nothing left unsaid about their expectations for the new hire (in essence, that you understand well what they need).
  2. Always strive to exceed client’s expectations when it comes to due diligence for the candidate’s qualifications, experience, skills, behavior, performance etc. Ask meaningful and detailed questions of your candidates. Ask for real-life examples. Let the candidate know that it’s the only way they can present themselves in a unique way.
  3. Be transparent and honest about the job when you speak with the candidate. If it’s a parallel move for them, don’t make it sound like it’s something else. Be open and let them know of the advantages and challenges of the role at the same time. If they are at a different point in their career than what you expected, don’t oversell the position. Same can be said with candidates that miss the mark on the client’s expectations.
  4. If a client has unrealistic / hard-to-meet expectations regarding the speed of recruiting or available candidates in the talent pool, you must speak up! You need to act as a consultant to the client. Because you are the expert of your trade, you will have unique perspectives that have been tested and validated throughout tens or hundreds of recruiting engagements.
  5. When you present a candidate to the client (ideally over the phone or in person), make sure to show clearly why they were selected, and to what degree they meet/exceed the expectations that were agreed in the first place. Don’t just present a resume, but also let the client about your thought process. This is a tremendous opportunity to act as a consultant to your client.
  6. Time and information will break you regardless if you are disciplined or not. That’s why you need to have a system – an applicant tracking system – to follow through your process and to keep you on track, remind you about upcoming calls, meetings, deadlines, tasks, etc.
  7. Always follow up with candidate and clients with regular updates, even if they are negative – i.e. a different candidate has been selected following the in-person interview with the client. When you don’t communicate in the recruitment process, stakeholders will assume the worse.

You may start with these 7-steps early warning system and develop your own version, but thinking proactively about everything that can go wrong will prepare you for most of what can go wrong.

 

Photo credit: Photo by James Pond on Unsplash