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hiring Archives - SourceMatch

So you want to grow? Start with Recruiting.

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Recruiting is crucial for growth

Talent, what a tricky little thing! It is hard to find, hard to manage, let alone to retain, but truth be told, a company can’t thrive without it. Companies that are capable to hire talented people are more likely to achieve high success rates that in turn translate into financial gains. In other words, talent is money. Therefore, in the world of HR, talent is put on a pedestal and is viewed as a diamond. Chiseled or in the rough, diamonds are a precious sign of prosperity. It is exactly the same with talent and recruiters know it: if they place talent in the company, that company will prosper beyond its means. And this is why at SourceMatch we refined the ways we search for talent because we understand the impact and value it can have for our clients.

So, talent is important for growth. But the acquisition of high performers takes significant effort and expertise. Imagine you hire a very talented professional and you find yourself in a scenario resembling that joke with the gamer arriving in hell: after he wreaks havoc and destroys everything, he keeps asking where the next level is. Talent combined with pride will not lead to growth, it will create chaos. Or think about how important it is to hire people that do not only have potential but also have a sense of loyalty. You most definitely want to hire people who strive to grow in the environment you offer them. These professionals are not only great team players but when they outgrow their role, they ensure continuity by coaching others on their own development. Identifying personality traits that lead to growth-generating behavior isn’t easy. The recruiting process needs to be tweaked in such a manner that it will generate the best fit for your company. Therefore, many companies after encountering all sorts of hurdles in the recruiting process choose to either outsource it or bring in a partner to assist and advise them. Whether they specialize in recruiting consulting or head-hunting, these partners work with a diverse number of client organizations, using and improving their best practices. Unless they do, they become irrelevant for the purpose of their business existence.

Having said that, we should all agree: companies can have significant benefits by working with recruiting companies. We are talking about the experts of the field who are hacking growth through recruiting. Efficient recruiting companies will help you scale up the recruiting process to generate the same level of quality candidates as before despite the increasing number of positions to fill. They will shed light on how to best show candidates what your organization’s values are. They can help you define aspects of HR you didn’t even know existed. For instance, let’s say that you embark on a hiring initiative and three months later you find yourself desperate to find a fit for a crucial position in your company. You are in the midst of organizational growth and you’re not able to move forward because you don’t have the right people in the right positions. And then you come up with the brilliant idea to bring in a partner to assist with the recruiting efforts. The recruiting company has inbuilt HR automation technology used to process information about the labor market faster. Its recruiters are able to build a list of prospective candidates in a fraction of the time you would on your own. Moreover, they create pipelines that allow them to swift through candidates ending up with those that are suitable for you. The right recruiting partner will act as an extension of your team, expanding your efforts and amplifying what has worked, improving what has not and so on.

There are many skills and there are multiple personalities. And to understand how these intertwine with each other is part of a recruiter’s role. When you identify a candidate for your company and give them a job, you expect them to grow with you. But if their personality and skills are not a match then it can be in your detriment. Our team is trained to recognize what matches your requirements beyond just the job description. But these requirements aren’t just related to candidates’ technical experience and need to also encompass behavioral traits and cultural fit. This is why we’ve developed what we call a “360-degrees look at who the candidates are”. At SourceMatch, we use this approach to assist clients with their hiring needs, so that their decision making is based on reliable information. When you want to grow in the right direction you want to have the depth of knowledge to make the right decisions. SourceMatch has developed its recruiting process so that we focus on what truly matters to our clients, which will be different from organization to organization. That means that we reach the best candidates at the right time within the shortest timeframe while making the client’s job significantly more effective. For instance, one of our clients was looking to fill two positions for a Project Manager role. After several months after we placed the candidates, they came back. They said they would like to continue our collaboration, as the candidates we placed were top performers. We knew how to look for those ingredients that would make someone great not only from a hard skills perspective but more importantly, from a soft skills standpoint.

Someone once had a thought: “Great things in business are never done by one person. They are done by a team of people.” It was Steve Jobs, the creator of the mighty Apple. He was on to something and we believe that it applies to all organizations. Engaging with a recruiting company such as SourceMatch is useful because it provides your business and talent acquisition team with a partner. When companies decide to partner with SourceMatch, they instantly have access to a team that’s committed to their growth by identifying the right talent. Searching and hiring talent isn’t about a transaction but about a relationship. Our purpose is to identify the professionals that you need in order to advance your development strategy. As of that moment, it all comes down to integrating them into your organization, vision and especially making it crystal clear how their work contributes to it.

In today’s market, having access to resources can make a difference in a company’s ability to compete. But more than any other, human resources are crucial in the development of those companies that have a clear strategy for growth, innovation, and impact in their market segments.

4 Hiring Trends 2019

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In the Infographic below, we’re highlighting 4 hiring trends that you should consider when making a hire in 2019.

Let’s talk about the first one: Artificial Intelligence.
AI, as we already noticed, has an impact on the recruiting processes, making them easier to handle. According to studies, 52% of talent acquisition leaders say the hardest part of recruitment is identifying the right candidates from a large applicant pool. Katrina Kibben, Randstad argues that “Any area of recruiting where distinct inputs and outputs occur – like screening, sourcing, and assessments – will largely become automated”.

However, AI requires abilities from a recruiter in order to use the new technologies, so the question remains: are the HR/ talent acquisition department/ recruiters ready for it?

Hiring for potential.
Although experience is not to be neglected, it does not equal performance. So why focus your attention on hiring for potential instead of experience? Besides the reduced costs, there are many benefits to what a less experienced but driven candidate might bring to the table, such as adaptability, creative thinking, communication skills, or flexibility.
Let’s keep in mind the fact that what used to work in the past, might not work in the future, and hence why adaptability is a key trait.

Work flexibility
Why offer flexible hours? Because you want happy and productive employees. Let’s put it this way: If an employee has problems in their personal life, it affects their professional one, and vice-versa. Work-life balance is a direct result of employees’ ability to have a say in how they use their time for work. Needless to say that with flexibility comes great responsibility and openness to staying accountable.

Candidate experience
Why is the candidate experience important, you may ask? Monster’s CandE report found that of the candidates who had a positive hiring experience:
1. 62% will increase their relationship with brands products and networks;
2. 78% would refer someone in the future;
3. 62% would apply again.

These trends help us understand how to best adapt to the future of work. They impact the way companies relate to the labor market, what candidates expect from new jobs, and how organizations can create an environment that encourages professionals to attain their full potential. Despite a heavy emphasis on autonomous technology, at SourceMatch we believe that human interaction is by far the one that candidates will remember best from the whole hiring process. So what are you doing to make sure that whether they are selected or not for a job, candidate’s will have a lasting positive impression of your organization, brand, and employees?

Sources:
ideal.com/ai-recruiting/
www.digitalistmag.com/future-of-work/2018/06/29/should-you-hire-for-experience-or-potential-06177338
theundercoverrecruiter.com/global-stats-recruiting-trends/
www.forbes.com/sites/serenitygibbons/2018/08/16/how-ai-can-make-recruiting-more-efficient/#186f43c52acc
www.shrm.org/ResourcesAndTools/hr-topics/talent-acquisition/pages/many-job-seekers-are-ready-to-work-with-ai-chatbots.aspx
medium.com/ansaro-blog/introducing-ansaro-767a1aaccbe
www.inc.com/springboard/5-reasons-to-hire-for-potential-over-experience.html
syndeohro.com/3919-2/
www.recruitment-international.co.uk/blog/2018/02/70-percent-of-millennials-want-flexible-working-options-research-finds
ideal.com/stats-candidate-experience/

hiring.monster.com/employer-resources/recruiting-strategies/talent-acquisition/candidate-experience-best-practices/

Inc. 5000 List – Why does it even matter?

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It’s not every day that we stop and enjoy milestones such as making it on the Inc. 5000 list. It’s an honor. In James Ledbetter’s (editor of Inc.) words: “If your company is on the Inc. 5000, it’s unparalleled recognition of your years of hard work and sacrifice. The lines of business may come and go, or come and stay. What doesn’t change is the way entrepreneurs create and accelerate the forces that shape our lives.” But why is it important? Why does such a list even exist?

All of it has to do with growth. Better products, faster services, more clients, higher quality, improved solutions, and win-win across the board. It’s what drives progress whether you look at the level of macro-economy or the grass roots of small businesses. This is the common denominator that Inc. uses to compile their annual Inc. 5000 list of performance among America’s top private companies. No company on this list has grown by less than 50% and for those that made the Inc. 500 list that rate is of at least 1,000%! Companies that made the list, on average, have grown sixfold since 2014. During a stretch when the economy grew around 11 percent, that’s a result most businesses can only dream of.

Job Creation
The private business sector has a significant responsibility to create jobs that not only benefit its members but also the entire economy. James Ledbetter reinforces that reality, stating that “Only about 12 percent of American companies achieve one-year revenue growth of 25 percent or more. Yet those are the companies that are responsible for half of all jobs created.”

Of course, growth comes with its challenges as it can rapidly lead to Icarus’ fate. It’s tempting to make calculated bets on incoming business and hiring people to deliver. Business leaders need however to be aware that a business can easily outgrow cash flow if it takes decisions based on too optimistic expectations.

Finding and Retaining Talent
By far one of the critical issues that organizations face, talent retention is only one side of the coin when it comes to people. With an official unemployment rate at its lowest in decades, finding candidates has become a headache for many businesses. Fast-growing companies will frequently need new staff especially if they do it proactively to meet demand when it comes. Within this context, many hiring managers make the mistake of rushing to fill jobs and fail to acknowledge the consequences of their decision in the long run. Growth, organizational culture and retention will all be affected in the process. In this type of economy, talented professionals will not hesitate to scrutinize each and every opportunity that they’re presented with which makes workplace culture so much more important.

This is why, SourceMatch recommends a 360 degrees hiring process that allows for an informed selection process that goes beyond a resume. At the same time, the current global economy presents many options and alternatives to the skills gap through remote work and inexpensive international expansion.

Technology
Not the least, the key enabler to fast growth is the acquisition and mastery of technology. Components such as social technologies, artificial intelligence, big data and advanced analytics, IoT, “anything” as a service, the fusion of digital and physical, digital commerce are all contributing to transparent and innovative business models. These no longer just support business functions, but have become the products and services that are provided to customers.

This technology revolution also brings a significant challenge as the speed of advancement forces organizations to find the best professionals to handle new and developing technologies. All of a sudden, technological literacy, programming, and digital communication become some of the most important skills that professionals need to bring to the interview table.

At SourceMatch we believe that finding the best talent is no easy fit, and is key to not just a business’ growth but the economy’s growth.

We are honored to be working with some of the leaders in various industries to help them achieve growth and greatness. Check our Case Studies Section.

Honored to be part of the 2018 Inc. 5000 List!
It is a privilege for SourceMatch to be part of this list. Being recognized for our work means a lot to us. Knowing what we do and helping our clients succeed in their projects is what makes us happy. When it comes to the recruiting process, we are always looking to improve and have great results by placing the best candidates where they are needed!

As an Inc. 5000 honoree, SourceMatch now shares a pedigree with Intuit, Zappos, Under Armour, Microsoft, GoPro, Timberland, Clif Bar, Patagonia, Oracle, Box, Grubhub, and dozens of other alumni that have gone on to become household names. In addition to SourceMatch, the class of 2018 includes powerhouses such as Peloton, Brooklinen, and Popsockets.

Photo credit: Bruno Nascimento on Unsplash

What are some red-Flags that let you know that Something’s Wrong with your Recruiting Process?

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Red flags are the absence of an early warning system. Of course, the obvious problems are consequences/effects of deeper causes and require reactive solving.

A strong recruiting process, like any business process, can only work well if it’s built with all its stakeholders’ interest in mind: Recruiter (recruitment company), the hiring manager (internal clients or external client company) and candidate – in this chronological order.

When any of the stakeholders is not given enough attention during recruitment you may see scenarios such as:

  • The recruiter is under a lot of pressure from the client to deliver, cuts corners in the candidate selection process. The client will receive a candidate whose qualifications are at best short of their need. The candidate will have her or his hopes high, expecting the “opportunity of their career”. The recruiter will live with the impression that he’s done a great job for the time he’s been given to find a candidate.
  • The client makes a recruitment order for a new role with the recruiter and picks a standard job description off the internet. The recruiter might look for a purple squirrel candidate that might not exist, or best-case scenario fits the internet’ job description instead of the real needs of the client. The candidate feels she’s a perfect fit and is surprised during the interview when the client brings up all sorts of questions that are beyond the “internet job description!”
  • Candidate interviews with the recruiter and provides basic answers to the vague questions that the recruiter asks. The recruiter is unbelievably happy that the candidate is a “perfect match”. The client interviews the candidate and is dumbfounded when they ask the candidate to elaborate on their experience.

These are just some examples, but in our experience, at SourceMatch there are a few guidelines for recruiters, which will help everyone in the process win. Here’s the early warning system for recruiters:

  1. Get to know your client, their trade, their culture, values, the hiring manager, the team where the new hire will work in, tangible and intangible factors, must haves and nice to have. Set the expectation early on with the client that you expect them to help you understand who they are and who they are trying to hire. The Job Description is at best 50% of all useful information. Once you have all info, ask the client to confirm in writing that there’s nothing left unsaid about their expectations for the new hire (in essence, that you understand well what they need).
  2. Always strive to exceed client’s expectations when it comes to due diligence for the candidate’s qualifications, experience, skills, behavior, performance etc. Ask meaningful and detailed questions of your candidates. Ask for real-life examples. Let the candidate know that it’s the only way they can present themselves in a unique way.
  3. Be transparent and honest about the job when you speak with the candidate. If it’s a parallel move for them, don’t make it sound like it’s something else. Be open and let them know of the advantages and challenges of the role at the same time. If they are at a different point in their career than what you expected, don’t oversell the position. Same can be said with candidates that miss the mark on the client’s expectations.
  4. If a client has unrealistic / hard-to-meet expectations regarding the speed of recruiting or available candidates in the talent pool, you must speak up! You need to act as a consultant to the client. Because you are the expert of your trade, you will have unique perspectives that have been tested and validated throughout tens or hundreds of recruiting engagements.
  5. When you present a candidate to the client (ideally over the phone or in person), make sure to show clearly why they were selected, and to what degree they meet/exceed the expectations that were agreed in the first place. Don’t just present a resume, but also let the client about your thought process. This is a tremendous opportunity to act as a consultant to your client.
  6. Time and information will break you regardless if you are disciplined or not. That’s why you need to have a system – an applicant tracking system – to follow through your process and to keep you on track, remind you about upcoming calls, meetings, deadlines, tasks, etc.
  7. Always follow up with candidate and clients with regular updates, even if they are negative – i.e. a different candidate has been selected following the in-person interview with the client. When you don’t communicate in the recruitment process, stakeholders will assume the worse.

You may start with these 7-steps early warning system and develop your own version, but thinking proactively about everything that can go wrong will prepare you for most of what can go wrong.

 

Photo credit: Photo by James Pond on Unsplash

Is it more Important for a Company to hire Based on Skill set fit or Based on Cultural fit?

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Of course, no one feels comfortable having to choose between the two. And yet, we don’t live in a perfect world and candidates bring different things to the interview table.

To even start thinking this topic through, it’s important we understand what a skill set is and what makes up the cultural fit.

Are skill sets important?

A skill set is a particular category of skills or abilities necessary to perform a job. Skill sets are easy to showcase based on previous jobs, numbers, achievements or in other words quantifiable facts. A good recruiter would have no problem to assess these looking at a resume, through interviews or tests.
So why even have any debates when a candidate can fit the job from a skills point of view?
After all, they will require less hand-holding, less training, and a shorter ramp-up period in the new job. They are people that hold a certain level of expertise that can just be plugged into an organization and bring immediate results.

What about culture fit?

It’s very tempting for recruiters who spend merely seconds to pick and choose what candidates will make it forward in the selections process. Candidates have complex personalities and unique combinations of upbringing and experiences.
When searching for new hires, hiring managers and recruiters want to ensure that the person who’ll join the organization will have preferences, personal and work styles that aren’t far from the hiring organization’s culture. Organizational psychology guru Adrian Furnham offers a definition for the cultural fit in his seminal academic textbook, “The Psychology of Behaviour at Work”: “A fit is where there is congruence between the norms and values of the organization and those of the person.”
Asking candidate’s questions such as the following will help you uncover their, likes, dislikes and expectations:

 -> Why do you want to work here?
 -> How would you describe your ideal workplace?
 -> What makes the work environment frustrating to you?
 -> Do you prefer working in a team or alone/as a sole contributor?
 -> Who was your best boss and what made them so great?

It’s critical however you take these questions and customize them to help you compare with your organization’s culture. Some companies are more loose when it comes to time and make results the sole main requirement, some are very eclectic and laid back wanting to foster creativity and outside-the-box thinking, and some that are very formal such as banks and other financial institutions.
If he/she is a fit, then they will feel good working for the company’s goals. The importance of cultural fit will reflect in the employee’s productivity. They will also be interested in the results they bring.

So what now?

You do need people to bring the right skills to the table to fulfill their jobs, and you also want a great alignment between the person’s and the organization’s values. However, as mentioned we don’t live in a perfect work: What if you had to choose between the skill set and culture alignment?
Culture always comes first.

Culture is the glue that holds an organization together, and the cost of poor culture fit can cost that organization between 50% to 60% of the person’s annual salary. So before you start vetting candidates, it’s critical that you define and articulate the organization’s culture (values, goals, practices, etc.). Only then will the recruiting process highlight the best candidates according that fit the culture.
Everything considered, culture fit should never be at the expense of different personalities, backgrounds, and a diverse workforce.

However, you do need to prioritize. First, make sure the values, ethics, morals, principles, etc. are there. Otherwise, you may find yourself hiring someone who has outstanding skills with a poor cultural fit. They will challenge your organization’s existence at every step of the way, either silently, or vocally. Sometimes it’s useful to have a new and constructive perspective on things. But if you have a culture that has proven time and time again to be beneficial for the organization’s development, for its employees and not the least its customers, then you should stick to it. Someone new who will not integrate with the team and organization will only cause unnecessary friction.

Lastly, in order to decrease the probability that you need to be in such a tough situation to choose between skill set and culture, hire continuously. Always be on the lookout for people who are shining in their current roles, who are delivering value to their customers and enjoy being part of something greater than themselves and their jobs.

 

Photo credit: Photo by Hunters Race on Unsplash

What are the best Practices for job Search?

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While it’s good to take note of the best practices out there, we recommend you take your own approach, tweak and customize what you find out there.

Why is it important, you ask? Because that’s what’s going to help you filter through the hundreds of job openings. Here are our recommendations:

  1. Don’t apply for all and any jobs, better apply for a select few with fierce attention to quality than to submit your stock resume to hundreds of job applications. When searching for a job, start with the end in mind: “I’m searching for a/this job because….” Why are you looking for a job? What’s your number one motivator? Is it career advancement? Better pay? Exciting new challenges? Now, once you have that pictured, keep it on top of everything else in your mind because that’s your number one driver!
  2. Know what you want. Think about your ideal job, what’s really important to you and what’s negotiable. That will help you navigate what jobs you apply to, how you differentiate companies if you’re willing to take a pay cut to help you switch industries or career, or where you see yourself fulfilled.
  3. If you wonder what a company looks like “on the inside”, check Glassdoor, or just try to connect with people who already work there (mutual connections or via social media). Don’t just apply for a job, apply for a job at a company you would like to work for, that cares for employees and treats them like they’re a key factor in its success.
  4. Write your resume as if it would be for your dream job. Spend time to make your resume concise, and state what’s really critical to the job and company you are applying to, quantify and provide specific details – don’t use words like “some”, “a few” or “more” but rather mention x% increase in productivity/sales, managed Y number of people, and reduced costs by Z% in T months, etc.
  5. Write with the reader in mind. It’s better for your resume to be shorter rather than longer – expect recruiters and managers to have limited time. Thus, it’s really important that your resume can easily be measured by the person who reads it. How do your facts and numbers correlate with what the job description is requiring? Have you used the same keywords? Can you switch some of your vocabularies with the wording that’s been used in the job description?
  6. Use a resume template. There are plenty of templates out there, and also tools to help you out (like MS Word’s new Resume Assistant from Linkedin). Don’t shy away from using a design-oriented/more creative resume as long as it doesn’t hinder readability.
  7. Always be ready to provide references – talk to the people who can be a reference for you – ideally supervisors or clients representatives who can speak to your abilities. Ask them what’s the best way they wish to be contacted for reference check (i.e. via Phone or email first?). Let them know what kind of job(s) you’re applying to and what they can expect as questions, contexts, etc.
  8. Be humble. Strike the right balance between facts that show the level of your abilities and desire to develop or improve other skills. May it be via a letter of interest or during your interview, the natural tendency is to highlight every and all great aspects of yourself. However, making it clear you have personal development goals and aspirations, and long terms goals says a lot about you (i.e. hit-and-run, or vision driven, non-complacent, etc.).
  9. Go prepared for an interview. Read ahead about the company’s reason for existence (vision, mission, what they sell or do) as well as their principles, who their customers are, and especially what attracted your attention about them. Have questions prepared ahead of an interview, questions that relate to the job or to confirm your understanding of the company. You don’t have a second chance to make the first impression, so make it count.
  10. Be confident. When you get at an interview, by that point, you already know why you are there, why you have been called to interview, what drives you and who you are talking to. Don’t use words like “I guess”, “perhaps” or “maybe.” Rather use statements “It’s my understanding that…”, “I know based on … ”, “I recommend” or “I strongly believe”. This will let the interviewer know that you have created your own perceptions, and opinions and that you’re not doubting yourself, or that you’ll change your view based on what you hear. In other words “Own who you are!”

This isn’t a comprehensive list. However, you can see a dotted line between all 10 points about: do your homework, do the research, be disciplined. Until you find a job, you need to be the best at finding one!

And finally: although there are thousands of applicants out there, you are unique based on your upbringing, personality, experiences, values, goals or vision. So act like it when searching, applying or interviewing for a job!

 

Photo credit: Photo by Damian Zaleski on Unsplash